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I have cramping, can essential oils help me?

An·ti·spas·mod·ic

Used to relieve spasm of

involuntary muscle

Essential oils can work for cramping muscles…stomach cramps, muscle cramps, restless leg cramps.

In case studies, I have found that certain essential oils can help alleviate every day cramping that can make life miserable.  A combination helped alleviate a client of stomach cramping associated with IBS, while another combination helped with menstrual cramps.  I had a client who had issues with restless leg syndrome.  A carefully blended combination of oils had her sleeping well for the first time in months.

How does that work?

Some oils are powerful antispasmodics such as Bergamot (Citrus bergamia), Roman chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile), and clary sage (Salvia sclarea). Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is also a smooth muscle relaxant with properties to alleviate nausea and diarrhea.
The chemical components involved here are linalyl acetate, d-limonene, and a-zingiberene.

Image by Kevin McIver from Pixabay

There are many oils to choose from that have antispasmodic properties. When working with clients, be sure to use oils that they like the aroma of, and would work for their particular history. The importance here is in the Client Intake form and subsequent consultation.
Check out my shop page for the forms needed to start you on the path to wellness.

https://justessentialstoday.com/consultation-payment-2/

Happy blending,

Crystal

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Can essential oils alleviate back pain?

How many people in the United States go to the doctor for back pain?

Image by mohamed Hassan from Pixabay

A 2012 NIH study shows that 11% of Americans had pain every day with 17% reporting severe levels of pain.  Forward to 2016, where a CDC published article shows that 20% of adults in the United States has chronic pain.

Back pain is a common reason that adults go to the doctor.  Most of the time, that back pain gets better, especially when it is not related to an injury.

How is pain usually treated by a physician?

The American College of Physicians guidelines for back pain generally recommend over-the-counter pain medication or an NSAID such as ibuprofen or naproxen sodium. NSAIDS relieve pain by preventing COX enzymes from working. COX-2 inhibitors like celecoxib or Celebrex block COX-2 enzymes. Some doctors prescribe prescription pain relievers.
Many people do not see a doctor for acute back pain unless it is injury specific, treating with rest and ice.

Can essential oils with analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and

pain-blocking therapeutic properties help my back pain?

If you study the data sheets of essential oils look for analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antinociceptive properties.  These data sheets are available from sellers of essential oils. There is a long list of essential oils that have pain modulating properties and numerous chemical components. 

Oils that are high in the chemical components a-pinene, linalool (linalool) and menthol have analgesic properties. Also oils that are high in camphene, b-myrcene, and b-pinene have anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive properties. There are many other oils that have these therapeutic properties, but I am just listing a few here.

What are some of the therapeutic components and how can they help?

Let’s look at menthol and menthone which bring us to peppermint essential oil.

Peppermint (Mentha x peperita) is known for its cooling and pain-relieving properties because of these components. It is in many over-the-counter remedies such as Icy hot, most BenGay products and Biofreeze. Like these products, your own DIY products are for localized areas and for short term use. Robert Tisserand states that a maximum dermal use of up to 5% is safe. (2nd Edition Essential Oil Safety, Tisserand Young, 2014).

Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) has the chemical components of linalool @ 27% and linalyl acetate @ 46%. Research shows that an eight-session manual acupressure with lavender oil (3% lavender oil; used as the massage lubricant) over a three-week period in patients with nonspecific subacute neck pain (32 patients) or low back pain (61 patients) significantly alleviated the neck and back pain and improved movements of the cervical and lumbar spine.
Koulivand, P. H., Khaleghi Ghadiri, M., & Gorji, A. (2013). Lavender and the nervous system. Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine: eCAM, 2013, 681304. https://doi.org/10.1155/2013/681304

In a 2017 study, Lavender angustifolia showed a reduction in pain of patient’s post-surgery for colorectal cancer. Using an inhalation of 1% lavender or 1% linalyl acetate, the study showed significant reduction to pain versus the control group.
So Hyun Yu, Geun Hee Seol, “Lavandula angustifolia Mill. Oil and Its Active Constituent Linalyl Acetate Alleviate Pain and Urinary Residual Sense after Colorectal Cancer Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial”, Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 2017, Article ID 3954181, 7 pages, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3954181

And finally, the other chemical component that has analgesic properties is a-pinene.
A-pinene of significant percentage, let’s say above 30% is found in pines @ around 40% for most, cypress @ 51%, juniper berry @ 36%; frankincense @ 45%. Again, it is important to check the GC/MS reports for your individual oils.

Studies of mice and frankincense oil (Boswellia carteri) revealed higher anti-inflammatory and anti-analgesic effects, compared to mice administered with water extracts.
Relatively more clinical studies have been found in scientific literature considering α- and β-pinene-containing plants than essential oils.

To date, most of the investigations have not studied the bioavailability of α-pinene and β-pinene in the human body, though these terpenes have antimicrobial, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antiallergic properties. Although several in vivo, and more recently, few clinical studies have assessed the pinenes biological effects, further efforts are needed to deepen knowledge in this field.
Salehi, B., Upadhyay, S., Erdogan Orhan, I., Kumar Jugran, A., L D Jayaweera, S., A Dias, D., Sharopov, F., Taheri, Y., Martins, N., Baghalpour, N., Cho, W. C., & Sharifi-Rad, J. (2019). Therapeutic Potential of α- and β-Pinene: A Miracle Gift of Nature. Biomolecules, 9(11), 738. https://doi.org/10.3390/biom9110738

If alleviating pain the natural way is for you, look into a consultation that offers you the personal attention you require! I provide custom-made blends that work harmoniously with your body to enhance your well-being.

Happy blending,

Crystal