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Eucalyptus essential oil

There are over 700 species of eucalyptus in the Myrtaceae family.

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The chemotype Globulus ( Common name- blue gum) is probably the best known and is a native of Australia. Most species are in the Oxide chemical family with 1,8-cineole being the most prominent component. These oils are good for clearing the head when experiencing a sinus issue. The oil is a stimulant and works to perk one up when tired.

The species of globulus, smithii and radiata have the highest percentage of 1,8-cineole.

Species Percentage of 1,8-cineole
Eucalyptus globulus 65-84%
Eucalyptus smithii 77%
Eucalyptus radiata 60-64%
Eucalyptus macarthurii 28-29%
Eucalyptus dives 0.56%
1,8-cineole content of eucalyptus chemotypes


The popular therapeutic benefits of these oils are for cold and flu relief: relief of congestion and as an expectorant.

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Eucalyptus macarthurii ( Common name-Wooly-butt gum) has 44% of the chemical component geranyl acetate. This component has analgesic, antibacterial, antifungal and choleretic modulating properties. What does that mean? This oil is good for blends other than for a cold. A muscle rub blend, foot cream, and as a digestion blend.

Other chemotypes of eucalyptus such as

Eucalyptus citriodora also called Lemon-scented gum, has no 1,8-cineole component. The citriodora chemotype has 66-86% of the chemical component citronellal. This oil is an aldehyde, used as a bug repellent, for its anti-inflammatory modulating affect, and to calm.
Eucalyptus dives (Common name-Blue peppermint gum) is great for moving mucus; use as a chest rub (diluted) or a steam.

Other uses for Eucalyptus dives is to treat tired feet in a relaxing foot bath after a long day on your feet. The refreshing scent is also good for cleaning the house. Eucalyptus dives can help even and tone the skin, especially for those prone to blemishes.

Melbourne pharmacist, Joseph Bosisto established a distillery in 1854 to gather the oil of E. radiata. He exhibited his oil at seventeen exhibitions between 1854 and 1891.

Pearson, Michael. “The Good Oil: Eucalyptus Oil Distilleries in Australia”, Australian Historical Archaeology, 11, 1993.

Eucalyptus is for more than just cold and flu season,

and the lack of 1,8-cineole in the dives chemotype makes it great to use in households with younger children. Blend with lavender, cedarwood or orange for a blend to promote relaxation (lavender), clear breathing (cedarwood) or lift spirits (orange).

Use in an inhaler or diffuser following safety guidelines-

Remember the eucalyptus chemotypes that are high in 1,8-cineole can suppress the Central Nervous System (CNS), and may impair breathing. Be safe in usage for children under 10 and those with asthma.

Happy blending,

Crystal

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Easy essential oils for children

Orange and lavender are easy essential oils that children love!

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There are some oil blends that are better than others for children.

I have asthmatics in my family, so Eucalyptus globulus is one oil that I use a substitute for often.  In the beginning of my training as a certified aromatherapist that I discovered that my daughter gets a tight chest from smelling the eucalyptus oil. Any time I am using an oil that has any 1,8-cineole, I have her smell the cap from slight distance to see if it causes her to tighten in the chest.

I learned this method from Andrea Butje at Aromahead Institute. The Aromahead approach is not to use oils high in 1,8-cineole on children under 5 and used with caution on children between ages 5-10.

It’s easy to substitute oils for Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus).

For children under 5 years old, with Cedarwood (Juniperus virginiana) or (Cedrus atlantica).

Oils that are easy to use for children–

Cedarwood (Cedrus atlantica) I currently have this version of cedarwood in my box. It is good for respiratory inhalers for children and asthmatic adults.

Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis) This oil smells like an orange peel! Of course kids love it, it’s uplifting and makes everyone smile. Using sweet orange oil is great because it has no phototoxic issues like other citrus. I covered that in the Fun in the Sun blog-check it out: https://justessentialstoday.com/fun-in-the-sun-with-essential-oils

Orange-Rose skin cream for children

1% dilution

1 oz. (28 grams) unscented body cream

4 drops Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis) oil

1 drop Rose Absolute (Rose damascene)

Add drop by drop to cream, blending after each addition.

Blend well. At a 1% dilution, this is a great smelling body cream.

Lavender (Lavendula angustifolia) is almost everyone’s favorite go-to oil. There are other lavenders and lavandins; Spike lavender (Lavendula latifolia) has 13% camphor—has a more herbal aroma than Lavender. It is an easy inhaler to use for alleviating headaches, promoting sleep and relaxation.

A few other safety tips for children:

Remember to only use 7-8 drops of oil in an inhaler, taking care with all the Eucalyptus oils.

To be safe, substitute cedarwoods instead. For a dermal product, always remember to test the area,

and use a dilution at 1% for children.

Happy blending,

Crystal.